Integrating and collaborating
with nature...
We connect people and nature.

Hard-wiring nature into our designs,
spaces and buildings.

And creating architecture to enhance
mental and physical wellbeing.
LAS PALMAS LONDON MILAN We connect people and nature.
Hard-wiring nature into our designs, spaces and buildings.
And creating architecture to enhance mental and physical wellbeing.

Current Projects Lanzarote - a dramatic landscape of lava and volcanoes. Here, ranged along the side of a volcano, are seven extra-ordinary dwellings, inspired by the volcanoes and the energy beneath. VOLCANIC
LIVING

An inhospitable and unwelcoming landscape then. But the great architectural son of Lanzarote, Cesar Manrique, softened this island with a unique confection of organic white painted shapes, low-rise housing, also white painted with green shutters, quirky wind sculptures at every roundabout, and planted with lush green vegetation imported to the island. Forming familiar, welcoming, nurturing and organic spaces for humans to unwind and relax. Like the volcanoes, his unique architectural and artistic legacy remains dormant and carefully curated since his untimely death in 1992. THE CANARY ISLAND OF LANZAROTE A moonscape of lava rock, sharp and uninviting, punctuated by volcanoes, in colours of red, brown and black, and underneath all this a sense of the energy of molten magma. For a period of six years, between 1730 and 1736, the volcanoes which erupted covered most of the fertile land of the island, and although a smaller eruption occurred in 1824, the volcanoes are now dormant. But visit Timanfaya National Park and you can feel the heat of the magma under the surface with your bare hands. Offers a landscape which is dramatic and edgy.

A new
volcanic
vernacular
But there is now a newcomer on this island, setting out to redefine and recreate a new architectural language for Lanzarote.

Architecture.Redefined. (AR) has designed seven stunning apartments on the side of a volcano to provide additional accommodation units to a new boutique hotel.

Despite this, the shards have a clear form all of their own – they might have been thrust up through the earth’s crust as the volcanoes, but they are undeniably concrete. Smooth surfaces, sharp geometric edges – all in contrast to the malpais (“bad lands”) around them.

But move in closer, and the overlapping shards have formed internal spaces. Dramatic volumes, acute angles, all embedded in the surrounding terrain, the stark white rendered internal surfaces contrasting with the dark grey polished concrete floors.
And through the glazing which forms the entire outward-facing façade, an extraordinary view down and across the volcanic landscape, studded with cones of differing colours.

In another nod to the island’s volcanic origins, each apartment is approached from above, down a staircase descending within a lava tube to a cool and refreshingly damp semi-subterranean antechamber, dramatically lit by shafts of sunlight during the day, and subtle lighting at night. From there, a large pivot-hung door allows access to the hidden inside and the stunning view beyond.

Deeply rooted in the volcanic origins of the island, the apartments are formed from shards of concrete, thrust upwards in dramatic form as if pushed by the energy below ground.

As alien and other-wordly as the surrounding lava landscape, the concrete shards are uncompromising – sharp, angular and hard. The shards take on the rust-brown hue of the surrounding lava – indeed, that lava has been crushed to constitute part of the concrete.


Deeply rooted in the volcanic origins of the island, the apartments are formed from shards of concrete, thrust upwards in dramatic form as if pushed by the energy below ground. 

As alien and other-wordly as the surrounding lava landscape, the concrete shards are uncompromising – sharp, angular and hard. The shards take on the rust-brown hue of the surrounding lava – indeed, that lava has been crushed to constitute part of the concrete. 

Despite this, the shards have a clear form all of their own – they might have been thrust up through the earth’s crust as the volcanoes, but they are undeniably concrete. Smooth surfaces, sharp geometric edges – all in contrast to the malpais (“bad lands”) around them.

But move in closer, and the overlapping shards have formed internal spaces. Dramatic volumes, acute angles, all embedded in the surrounding terrain, the stark white rendered internal surfaces contrasting with the dark grey polished concrete floors. 

And through the glazing which forms the entire outward-facing façade, an extraordinary view down and across the volcanic landscape, studded with cones of differing colours. 

In another nod to the island’s volcanic origins, each apartment is approached from above, down a staircase descending within a lava tube to a cool and refreshingly damp semi-subterranean antechamber, dramatically lit by shafts of sunlight during the day, and subtle lighting at night. From there, a large pivot-hung door allows access to the hidden inside and the stunning view beyond.

Slide 2021. All Rights Reserved. London +44 800 652 8548 info@architectureredefined.com Grove Mews
42 The Grove
LONDON
United Kingdom
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